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Cicada orni, exuvia

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Cicada orni, exuvia
Esuvia di ninfe di cicale.jpg
Cicada orni, exuvia||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101154-e31392a3-th.jpg>MiniatureCicada orni, exuvie||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101258-9ff13fe1-th.jpg>Cicada orni, exuvia||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101154-e31392a3-th.jpg>MiniatureCicada orni, exuvie||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101258-9ff13fe1-th.jpg>Cicada orni, exuvia||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101154-e31392a3-th.jpg>MiniatureCicada orni, exuvie||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101258-9ff13fe1-th.jpg>Cicada orni, exuvia||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101154-e31392a3-th.jpg>MiniatureCicada orni, exuvie||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101258-9ff13fe1-th.jpg>Cicada orni, exuvia||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101154-e31392a3-th.jpg>MiniatureCicada orni, exuvie||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101258-9ff13fe1-th.jpg>Cicada orni, exuvia||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101154-e31392a3-th.jpg>MiniatureCicada orni, exuvie||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101258-9ff13fe1-th.jpg>Cicada orni, exuvia||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101154-e31392a3-th.jpg>MiniatureCicada orni, exuvie||<img src=./_datas/4/s/u/4sumaimsha/i/uploads/4/s/u/4sumaimsha//2012/02/17/20120217101258-9ff13fe1-th.jpg>

Classe: Hexapoda
Ordine: Hemiptera Cicadomorpha
Famiglia: Cicadidae
Genere: Cicada
Specie: Cicada orni

3 commenti

  • Lurraine - Martedì 17 Aprile 2012 06:41
    Well it may go back a good bit further. Over at Jerry Coyne&#8217;s blog that started this thread, one commentator notes that the Swedish word for beetle is &#8220;bagge&#8221;, which seems highly likely to be a cognate. Since the Old Norse part of the ancestry of both English and Swedish goes back considerably earlier than Middle English, it would appear that this could be an old North Germanic term for a bug or beetle (or generic for both). On the other hand, there are the bug of &#8220;bugaboo&#8221;, and of &#8220;that bugs me&#8221; (in the ghost or goblin sense, at least mildly), an example of the common &#8220;inadequacy&#8221; of natural languages to come up with a separate term for every thing and concept about which people speak. Going way off on a tangent, I would note that there have been attempts to create artificial languages that had a separate and supposedly unambiguous term for every possible concept. Needless to say, they never caught on. People like the ease of expression, double entendre, punnery, etc. that natural language affords them.
  • Aslan - Martedì 3 Aprile 2012 09:52
    I suppose I&#8217;d better weigh in here since I&#8217;m the one who started the ruckus.I largely agree with the perspective offered by Alex that entomologists already have a perfectly good, unambiguous technical term for the so-called &#8220;true bugs&#8221;, one that does not require scare-quotes: Hemiptera. So trying to convince people that bug should be widely accepted as a synonym for hemipteran seems unnecessary as well as ultimately futile.Regarding Jesse&#8217;s point about ants, grasshoppers, etc: It seems to me the difference is that what we might call the folk-entomological meanings of those words happen to correspond closely to the technical meanings. Specialists and non-specialists can agree on what an ant is (or isn&#8217;t) because they&#8217;re using similar criteria to make those distinctions.The same does not seem to be true for bugs. Cheesy sci-fi flicks feature bug-eyed creepy-crawlies, not bug-mouthed piercy-suckies. Mouthparts are largely irrelevant to folk entomology; most people never get close enough to see the mouthparts. It&#8217;s the legs and eyes that make an impression. By those criteria, there is no clear distinction between near-bugs and &#8220;true&#8221; bugs; they&#8217;re all one category, which (at least where I come from) we call bugs. Not because we&#8217;re ignorant and don&#8217;t understand the technical meaning of the word &#8220;bug&#8221;, but because we&#8217;re using ordinary language to do folk taxonomy, as people have done since the invention of language.That&#8217;s my take on it anyway. Thanks for sharing yours.

  • Mehmet - Venerdì 30 Marzo 2012 05:17
    But one must be careful about Wictionary, since the oismelogtyts themselves may not have known whereof they wrote. My Oxford Universal English Dictionary more plausibly lists the oldest known use of bug in 1622 in the meaning of bedbug = Cimex, which is both ancient and biological Latin for bedbug, a true bug thus perhaps the truest bug of all!I find it interesting that a widely and also loosely used term for (mostly true) bugs in Spanish is chinche, which is the direct etymological descendent of Latin Cimex.
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